NorCal agencies approve plan to reduce climate change risks to water supply

The southern Sacramento Valley is at risk of experiencing a groundwater deficit within the next 50 years. This is according to predictive models run by the Sacramento Groundwater Authority (SGA). The main culprit of the deficit is climate change. Rising global temperatures are changing large-scale weather patterns to the point where the rainy season in Northern California is becoming less consistent. Meanwhile, the region’s demand for water is increasing. This is exactly why the SGA and four other groundwater sustainability agencies in parts of Sutter, Placer, and Sacramento counties have developed a long-term plan to sustain the region’s groundwater supply for generations to come. . SGA chief executive James Peifer said the plan’s approach is similar to how you would use a checking account. and it will be a very useful way for us to adapt to climate change,” Peifer said. Peifer said that as long as the plan worked, most wouldn’t notice the impact. At its core, the purpose of the plan is to avoid major water restrictions by carefully balancing this water supply “bank account“. The plan calls for proactive actions with well permits and land use to maintain a balance between surface water and groundwater. Groundwater levels will be monitored regularly and the plan will be resubmitted every five years to ensure things stay on a promising track.

The southern Sacramento Valley is at risk of experiencing a groundwater deficit within the next 50 years. This is according to predictive models run by the Sacramento Groundwater Authority (SGA).

The main culprit of the deficit is climate change. Rising global temperatures are changing large-scale weather patterns to the point where the rainy season in Northern California is becoming less consistent. Meanwhile, the region’s demand for water is increasing.

This is exactly why the SGA and four other groundwater sustainability agencies in parts of Sutter, Placer, and Sacramento counties have developed a long-term plan to sustain the region’s groundwater supply for generations to come. .

SGA chief executive James Peifer said the plan’s approach is similar to how you would use a checking account.

“You don’t want to expose it. You want to make a deposit before you take a draw. We can do that with the groundwater basin and it will be a very useful way for us to adapt to climate change,” said said Peifer. .

Peifer said that as long as the plan worked, most wouldn’t notice the impact. At its core, the purpose of the plan is to avoid major water restrictions by carefully balancing this water supply “bank account“.

The plan calls for proactive actions with well permits and land use to maintain a balance between surface water and groundwater. Groundwater levels will be monitored regularly and the plan will be resubmitted every five years to ensure things stay on a promising track.

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